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Watch This Air Force Osprey Accidentally Destroy a Hospital Helipad

  • A U.S. Air Force Osprey tiltrotor accidentally blew away a hospital helipad.
  • The Osprey, with its two powerful tilting rotors, has a reputation for creating mayhem with its downwash.
  • The Air Force uses the Osprey for long-range, special operations transport missions.

    A U.S. Air Force Osprey tiltrotor accidentally demonstrated what happens when you point 12,000 horsepower straight down: you blow away a helicopter helipad. The helipad, apparently made of rubber matting, was no match for the Osprey’s two Rolls-Royce engines.

    You love badass military aircraft. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    The incident took place on Wednesday at the Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, the U.K. The helipad was used in a military exercise involving U.S. Air Force units. As the CV-22 Osprey took off, it lifted the mats that created the helipad into the air and blew them in all directions.

    Here’s the video:

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    “Addenbrooke’s is the major trauma centre for the East of England, and its helipad is used by the East Anglian Air Ambulance, Magpas Air Ambulance and Essex and Herts Air Ambulance,” according to ITV, a U.K. news site.

    The U.S. Air Force acknowledged its blunder. “The area was surveyed according to our policies and procedures and some damage did occur,” a member of the Air Force’s 48th Fighter Wing told ITV. “We are taking steps to rectify as soon as possible.”

    The V-22 Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that uses two wingtip-mounted propellers to achieve flight. The rotors can be pointed downward for vertical or short takeoff and landing, or rotated 90 degrees to provide forward thrust like a regular propeller-driven aircraft.

    In the downward position, especially at takeoff power, the Osprey has a reputation for blowing things away. Lawn chairs, tents, and even trees can’t withstand the power of the Osprey’s two Rolls-Royce Liberty AE1107C engines. Behold:

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    The offending Osprey likely belongs to the 7th Special Operations Squadron, part of the 352nd Special Operations Wing based at RAF Mildenhall. The U.S. Air Force Operates a global fleet of 50 Ospreys for use as long-range special operations transports.

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